WHO'S RESPONSIBLE FOR WHAT

Under the Flood and Water Management Act 2010 all risk management authorities mentioned below have a duty to co-operate with each other and to share data.

A key theme of the Flood and Water Management Act 2010 was for flood risk management authorities to work in partnership to deliver flood risk management better to the benefit of their communities.
null

The Environment Agency

(EA) In England

The Environment Agency

Responsible for taking a strategic overview of the management of all sources of flooding and coastal erosion and are responsible for managing the risk of flooding from main rivers, reservoirs, estuaries and the sea.

They issue flood warnings through Floodline, 0345 988 1188.

Provide information on areas at risk of river and coastal flooding through flood risk maps.

null

Natural Resources Wales (NRW)

Cyfoeth Naturiol Cymru In Wales

Natural Resources Wales (NRW)

Responsible for taking a strategic overview of the management of all sources of flooding and coastal erosion and are responsible for managing the risk of flooding from main rivers, reservoirs, estuaries and the sea.

They issue flood warnings through Floodline, 0345 988 1188.

Provide information on areas at risk of river and coastal flooding through flood risk maps.

Lead Local Flood Authorities

(LLFAs)

Lead Local Flood Authorities

LLFAs are Unitary or Country Councils and are responsible for coordinating flood risk management in their area.

Are responsible for managing the risk of flooding from surface water, groundwater and ordinary watercourses and lead on community recovery.

They are responsible for maintaining a register of flood risk assets and surface water risk.

If a flood happens all local authorities must have plans in place to respond to emergencies.

Local Authorities

Local Authorities

Carry out flood risk management works on minor watercourses, working with LLFAs and others.

In coastal areas, they also act as coastal erosion risk management authorities.

Planning Authorities

Planning Authorities

The planning authority is often the local borough or district council. National park authorities and the Broads Authority are also local planning authorities.
They are responsible for developing Local Plans, setting out how areas will develop in the future.
They also make decisions through Planning Committees on which planning applications get approval.
Communities can shape development in their areas through the production of Neighbourhood Plans.

Internal Drainage Boards

(IDBs)

Internal Drainage Boards

IDBs are independent public bodies responsible for water level management in low lying areas (approximately 10% of England at present), working in partnership with other authorities.

Highways Authorities

Highways Authorities

Responsible for providing and managing highway drainage and roadside ditches. They must ensure that road projects do not increase flood risk. Highways England is responsible for motorways and major trunk roads. Local authorities or national park authorities are responsible for other roads.

Water and sewerage companies

Water and sewerage companies

Water and sewerage companies are responsible for managing the risks of flooding from piped water and foul or combined sewer systems providing drainage from buildings and yards.

Riparian Owners

Riparian Owners

If you own land or property next to a river, stream or ditch you are a riparian owner and have responsibilities to maintain the waterway but also rights to protect your property from flooding. For more information speak to your local authority land registry dept. or download guidance from the Environment Agency’s Living on the Edge.

Property Owners

Householders and Business Owners

Property Owners

People are responsible for looking after their own property, including reducing the risks of water entering it and of causing damage. Therefore, it is important that people are aware of their flood risk and take measures to better protect themselves, where appropriate.

The drainage pipes located beneath your house, garden or driveway belong to you and are your responsibility. These stop being your responsibility the moment they reach outside the boundary of your property and/or connect to pipes serving another property. So if there’s a problem with a private drain or sewer, it’s up to you to pay for an independent drain clearing company to carry out any clearance work.

If you are uncertain about any of these responsibilities or need some advice contact your water company or our helpline on 01299 403055.